EEO-1 Reporting Deadline Extended

February 4, 2019

By Subhash Viswanathan

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced Friday in a press release that the opening of the EEO-1 Survey for 2018 has been postponed until March 2019 and the deadline for submitting EEO-1 data will be extended until May 31, 2019.

The EEO-1 report must be filed by:  (1) private employers with 100 or more employees, excluding state and local governments, primary and secondary school systems, institutions of higher education, Indian tribes, and tax-exempt private membership clubs other than labor organizations; and (2) federal government contractors or first-tier subcontractors with 50 or more employees and a contract, subcontract, or purchase order amounting to $50,000 or more.

Filers should check the EEOC web page pertaining to the EEO-1 Survey in the coming weeks for details, instructions, and schedule updates.

Read More >> EEO-1 Reporting Deadline Extended

Bond Attorneys Author the New York Employment Law Guide for Chambers USA© 2019 Regional Employment Publication

January 24, 2019

The USA: Regional Employment Guide provides in-depth legal commentary on key issues and major trends in 2019 for those global entities seeking to establish or enhance their presence in the United States.  Published by Chambers and Partners, the firm regarded by many as the pre-eminent global authority on the legal profession, the Guide covers the important developments in the most significant U.S. jurisdictions.

Michael Bernstein, a senior attorney in Bond's New York City office, was the Contributing Editor and author of the Introduction in this valuable resource.  The team of Bond attorneys who authored the New York Employment Law analysis in the Chambers’ Guide, included:  Louis P. DiLorenzo, Thomas G. Eron, Howard M. Miller, Thaddeus J. Lewkowicz, Joanna L. Silver, Dennis A. Lalli, and Michael D. Billok.

Read More >> Bond Attorneys Author the New York Employment Law Guide for Chambers USA© 2019 Regional Employment Publication

Recent NLRB Decision Restricts the Scope of Protected Concerted Activities Under the National Labor Relations Act

January 24, 2019

By Adam P. Mastroleo

On January 11, 2019, in Alstate Maintenance, LLC, the National Labor Relations Board issued a decision that draws a clear distinction between employee conduct that constitutes protected "concerted activities" under the National Labor Relations Act and employee conduct that constitutes unprotected individual action.

Under Section 7 of the NLRA, employees have a right to engage in "concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection."  Over the years, as the Board majority in Alstate Maintenance pointed out, the Board has issued decisions that "blurred the distinction" between protected group action and unprotected individual action.  The Board majority characterized its Alstate Maintenance decision as the beginning of the process of restoring that distinction "by overruling conflicting precedent that erroneously shields individual action and thereby undermines congressional intent to limit the protection afforded under the Act to concerted activity for the purpose of mutual aid or protection."

Read More >> Recent NLRB Decision Restricts the Scope of Protected Concerted Activities Under the National Labor Relations Act

Gregory Reilly, Aisling McAllister, and Samuel Dobre Join Bond in New York City

January 22, 2019

Bond, Schoeneck & King is pleased to announce that Gregory B. Reilly, Aisling M. McAllister, and Samuel G. Dobre have joined the firm, giving Bond 21 labor and employment attorneys in New York City.  Both Reilly and McAllister are prominent, management side labor and employment lawyers, both former partners of Martin Clearwater & Bell, where Reilly led the Labor and Employment practice which also included Dobre as an associate at that firm.  Prior to working at Martin Clearwater & Bell, Reilly was also a partner at Littler Mendelson.

Read More >> Gregory Reilly, Aisling McAllister, and Samuel Dobre Join Bond in New York City

System-Wide SUNY Policy Will Require All SUNY Campuses to Develop a Sexual and Romantic Relationship Policy by March 1, 2019

January 10, 2019

By Stephanie H. Fedorka and Theresa E. Rusnak

On October 9, 2018, the State University of New York (“SUNY”) Board of Trustees adopted a new resolution imposing new policy requirements with regard to consensual or amorous relationships among faculty, staff, and students.  The new SUNY policy requirements come in light of the recent New York State sexual harassment prevention policy and training requirements and guidelines.  This system-wide policy now requires that all SUNY campuses develop and disseminate a “Sexual and Romantic Relationship Policy” to their respective campus communities on or before March 1, 2019.  The new policy requirements apply to all SUNY campuses, including all state-operated campuses, statutory colleges, and community colleges.

Read More >> System-Wide SUNY Policy Will Require All SUNY Campuses to Develop a Sexual and Romantic Relationship Policy by March 1, 2019

Reminder: New York Minimum Wage Rates and Salary Thresholds for the Executive and Administrative Exemptions Will Increase on December 31, 2018

December 7, 2018

By Subhash Viswanathan

Although the minimum wage rate under the Fair Labor Standards Act remains $7.25 per hour and the U.S. Department of Labor has not issued any new proposed regulations to raise the minimum salary to qualify for a white-collar exemption under federal law, employers in New York will be required to comply with the new state minimum wage rate and the new state salary threshold to qualify for the executive and administrative exemptions, effective December 31, 2018.

Read More >> Reminder: New York Minimum Wage Rates and Salary Thresholds for the Executive and Administrative Exemptions Will Increase on December 31, 2018

Employers May Be Liable for the Release of Employees' Personally Identifying Information in Data Breaches

December 6, 2018

By Nicholas P. Jacobson

It seems that reports of hackers breaching a business’s security measures to obtain customer information appear on an almost weekly basis.  Unfortunately, businesses need to worry not only about the unauthorized access of customer data by hackers, but also the unauthorized access of sensitive employee information as well.

Read More >> Employers May Be Liable for the Release of Employees' Personally Identifying Information in Data Breaches

Ban the Box: Westchester County Passes Legislation Prohibiting Conviction History Questions on Job Applications

December 5, 2018

By Jacqueline A. Smith

Following the trend of other counties and municipalities throughout New York State who have adopted “fair chance” or “ban the box” legislation, the Westchester County Board of Legislators passed a local law on December 3 which would prohibit employers from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal conviction or arrest record in employment applications.  The law, which will go into effect 90 days after it is signed by the County Executive, also bans employment advertisements, solicitations, or publications containing any “limitation, or specification in employment based on a person’s arrest record or criminal conviction.”

Read More >> Ban the Box: Westchester County Passes Legislation Prohibiting Conviction History Questions on Job Applications

The First Department Appellate Division Adopts An Expanded Definition of Marital Status Discrimination Under the New York City Human Rights Law

November 20, 2018

By Subhash Viswanathan and Kaveh Dabashi

In 1980, the New York Court of Appeals (the highest court in New York) held that the prohibition against "marital status" discrimination contained in the New York State Human Rights Law includes only discrimination based on the status of being married or not married, and does not prevent an employer from taking an adverse employment action against an employee based on the identity or occupation of a person's spouse.  In that case, Manhattan Pizza Hut, Inc. v. New York State Human Rights Appeal Board, the Court upheld the employer's decision to discharge the plaintiff because her husband was employed as her supervisor in violation of the employer's anti-nepotism policy.  In a recent decision, however, the First Department Appellate Division adopted a more expanded definition of marital status discrimination under the New York City Human Rights Law.

Read More >> The First Department Appellate Division Adopts An Expanded Definition of Marital Status Discrimination Under the New York City Human Rights Law

New York Issues Final Model Sexual Harassment Policy and Training Guidelines

October 2, 2018

By Subhash Viswanathan

On October 1, the New York State Division of Human Rights issued its final model sexual harassment policy and training guidelines to assist employers in complying with the new sexual harassment legislation that will become effective October 9, 2018.  One piece of good news for employers is that the Division's final training guidelines no longer require that employers train all employees by January 1, 2019, as the Division initially proposed.  Instead, according to the FAQs, employers will have until October 9, 2019 -- a full 12 months from the effective date of the legislation -- to complete the training for all employees.  In addition, the Division's final training guidelines no longer require that new employees complete the sexual harassment training within 30 calendar days of starting their job.  Instead, the Division's guidelines simply encourage employers to train their new employees "as soon as possible" after beginning employment.

Read More >> New York Issues Final Model Sexual Harassment Policy and Training Guidelines

Labor Class Civil Service Employees Afforded Job Protection

September 12, 2018

By Craig L. Olivo

On September 7, 2018, Governor Cuomo signed legislation that amended Civil Service Law Section 75.  Pursuant to the amendments, Section 75 now extends hearing rights (i.e., the right to written disciplinary charges and a hearing before imposition of a reprimand, fine, suspension without pay, demotion or termination) to “Labor Class” employees after five years of continuous service.  This is the same protection that has previously been afforded to employees in the Non-Competitive Class after five years of continuous service and employees in the Competitive Class immediately upon permanent appointment.  Prior to this amendment, Labor Class employees had no such protections unless they were veterans or exempt volunteer firefighters.  The amended law is effective immediately.  If you are a public employer and have any Labor Class employees who have completed five years of continuous service, they are now protected pursuant to Section 75.

Read More >> Labor Class Civil Service Employees Afforded Job Protection